ARCHIVE SEARCH
      -OR-  
 
  NEWS CHANNELS
Fitness News
Asthma Allergy News
 > Diabetes News
Women's Health News
Men's Health News

  MY NEWS
Personal Archive
My Account

  ABOUT THIS NEWSFEED
About Us
Advertise With Us
Feed Your Site
Contact Us


Site Map
RSS News Feed 

  Website development & hosting
   by Cyber Software Solutions

 
Sugary Drinks, Obesity Linked Even in Very Young Children
In face of mixed data, study findings support association in children 5 years old and younger

MONDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption has been tightly linked to weight status among older children; children 5 years and younger who consume sugar-sweetened beverages such as soda or sports drinks are also more likely to become overweight or obese, according to a study published online Aug. 5 in Pediatrics.

Mark D. DeBoer, M.D., from the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, and colleagues examined the association between consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight (as assessed by body mass index [BMI] z scores) in 9,600 children from 2 to 5 years of age.

The researchers found a significant association between greater consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and BMI z score at 4 and 5 years of age but not at 2 years of age. Compared with infrequent drinkers or nondrinkers, 5-year-olds who regularly consumed sugary beverages were at significantly greater risk of being obese (odds ratio, 1.43), and 2-year-olds drinking sugary beverages were significantly more likely to have greater increases in BMI z score over the next two years.

"Similar to what is seen among older children, children aged 2 to 5 years drinking sugar-sweetened beverages demonstrate both prospective and cross-sectional correlations with higher BMI z score," DeBoer and colleagues conclude.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)



Health News Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Back to Top Stories
  GOOGLE ADS